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So, Your Student Wants to Change Majors?

Approximately 40 freshmen attended the ARC's session for undeclared majors during the Advising for Your Major Day on October 28. The students learned how to explore major and take general education courses while staying on track to graduate.

Approximately 40 freshmen attended the ARC’s session for undeclared majors during the Advising for Your Major Day on October 28. The students learned how to explore majors and take general education courses while staying on track to graduate.

Registration for spring 2015 courses for began yesterday with the seniors. By November 14, nearly all current degree-seeking students will have registered for courses.  For freshmen who are unsure what they’ll major in, or those  having second thoughts about what they thought was a “sure thing” a few months ago, the process can seem even more overwhelming for them than typical student. Here is some important information about changing majors if you, as a parent or family member, are having conversations with your student about changing majors.
Changing majors is very much to be expected, and totally normal. As high school seniors (and typical 18-year olds), students don’t always put a lot of thought into selecting a major. Maybe a student picked nursing because he or she has a cousin who is a nurse. Maybe a student picked biology because she or he heard that doctors make a lot of money. Maybe a student picked English because she or he has always been a Twilight fan. Maybe a high school teacher or family member suggested a specific major because they thought it would fit the student’s skills and interests.  Often, when first-year college students actually start taking classes for their majors, they may realize that there may be a better fit for them in another area.Many freshmen know they want to change majors, but not what field they would like to pursue. We recommend to these students that they list themselves as “Undeclared.” These freshmen, if they have not done so already, should make appointments to speak with an advisor in the Academic Resource Center  and use personal assessment resources available in the Career Center.It is recommended that students choose a major based on what they like and what they can do well in. If students find a course of study that interests them, Bellarmine will help them figure out their next step. We often talk to students about double majors or minors in order to increase their options. In addition, the Career Center can direct students in a step-by-step process about applying to graduate schools.
Choosing a major is all about utilizing resources. There are many, many people on campus that students can consult about selecting a major. Encourage your student to do their research and to take advantage of the personal attention that Bellarmine offers.
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About Cassie

I'm the Director of the Writing Center and Director of Parent Communications at Bellarmine University.

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